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Both President Trump and former Attorney General Eric Holder have said they want to fix parts of the system, but really they are working to help their own parties, writes Opdycke.

On reform, both parties should start by looking inward

Opdycke is president of Open Primaries, which advocates for nonpartisan primaries open to all voters.

End Citizens United, a political action committee, is urging Democratic presidential contenders to champion anti-corruption to defeat President Trump. Tom Steyer's entry into the race may help bolster this argument. His launch video stresses the importance of addressing voter frustration with big party and big money control: "Really what we are trying to do is make democracy work by pushing power down to the people."

"It's key to winning back independents, the kind of independents that Democrats have lost over the last couple cycles," Adam Bozzi, vice president for communications at End Citizens United, told Politico. "It's a jump ball: Voters don't know who to trust, whether it's Trump or a Democrat, on this issue."

There are reasons that voters — most especially independents — don't know who to trust to "drain the swamp."

The biggest lack of trust is that politicians, including those who speak out on reform, are consistently silent on the corruption within their own parties.

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