Donate
News. Debate. Community. Levers for a better democracy.
MOST READ
Get some leverage.

Sign up for The Fulcrum newsletter.

Big Picture
True
Alex Wong/Getty Images

"Being a stringent 'die-hard' of anything can almost never be a good thing and if more voters took the time to consider that there are more than two sides to every issue, our democracy would be all the better for it," writes Alexa Mikalaski.

Having no party ID is actually taking a side — for independence

Mikalaski is a staff writer for Independent Voter News and marketing coordinator for IVC Media, a digital marketing firm affiliated with IVN.

In a country that often feels divided between two camps, the Republicans and the Democrats, independent voters could really be the future of politics in America.

While polarized, if not combative, politics are nothing new (e.g., the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 that tore the nation apart), there is something undeniably different about the political climate that we have had for the last few years.

Keep reading... Show less
News. Community. Debate. Levers for better democracy.

Sign up for The Fulcrum newsletter.

Voting
True
Independent Voter News

Something has to give: The case for independents

Mikalaski is a staff writer for Independent Voter News and marketing coordinator for IVC Media, a digital marketing firm affiliated with IVN.

This is the first in a three-part series on independent voters.

The most basic right in a healthy democracy is the right to vote. Without this right, governments can turn into the worst of autocracies and dictatorships, ignoring the needs of citizens and abusing the power of the state. Voter discrimination is not a new phenomenon and has been around since the very beginning of the United States.

When we talk about voter discrimination in the U.S., many obvious examples come to mind.

When our country was formed in 1776, only white men over the age of 21 were allowed to vote. Black men weren't legally given the right to vote until the 15th Amendment was added to the Constitution in 1870 and even so, previously Confederate states passed Jim Crow laws that continued to systematically disenfranchise black voters.

Keep reading... Show less