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Tristiaña Hinton/The Fulcrum

During the outbreak, an election timetable change both parties can support

Johnson is executive director of Election Reformers Network, a nonprofit founded by international election specialists now supporting reform in the United States.

Regrettably, the bipartisan cooperation that enabled last month's $2.2 trillion economic stimulus package fell short when it came to addressing concerns about coronavirus and elections.

Congress did allocate $400 million for state election preparation, but proposals to require more voting by mail and early in-person voting met with partisan rancor. And President Trump has now acknowledged the underlying political calculus: Republicans win more often when fewer people vote.

Last week's footage of Wisconsinites risking virus exposure to go to the polls dramatically illustrated the impact of that strategy, and those images perhaps will nudge the GOP position. Trump seems to have moderated somewhat, tweeting that absentee voting "is a great way to vote for seniors, military, and others who can't get to the polls."

Finding common ground on these processes that public health officials uniformly recommend would be a great sign that our leaders can rise above politics in a time of crisis.

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Anthony Devlin, Getty Images Europe

A Labour canvasser and a British voter at a polling station near Manchester in December.

Revamp House's election method? Consider the last Parliament vote.

Johnson is executive director of Election Reformers Network, a nonprofit founded by international election specialists now supporting reform in the United States.

Our historical cousins in the United Kingdom vote much like we do — in single-member districts, under simple plurality rules — so their elections are worth paying attention to. This is particularly true now that "the duopoly," the dominance of two parties characteristic of single-member-district systems, has become such a source of concern here in the United States.

The recent elections in the U.K. illustrate just how dominant a duopoly can be, even in a country with well-established third parties. More importantly, the elections illustrate that a new form of elections gaining prominence here, ranked-choice voting, will likely have only limited impact on reducing duopoly power, and that more significant reform means changing the single-member-district system itself, to the multimember approach called for in a bill before Congress dubbed the Fair Representation Act.

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