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"Teachers can help their students understand the impeachment hearings by cultivating the skills required to consider the evidence," argues Paula McAvoy.

Students should learn impeachment in school. Here’s how to make it work.

McAvory is an asssistant professor of Social Studies Education at North Carolina State University.

When Congress weighs whether to impeach the president, it is a question of national urgency.

Teachers can help their students understand the impeachment hearings by cultivating the skills required to consider the evidence. They can also help young Americans understand why people see this process in different ways – often based on their political views. Many teachers do this by devoting some time every week to helping students make sense of what is happening.

I've been either teaching social studies or researching civics education for the past 25 years. Based on this experience, I have three suggestions for teachers who are grappling with the challenge and ethics of bringing politics into the classroom at this divisive moment in the nation's history.

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