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Center for Responsive Politics

Nonpartisan, independent and nonprofit, the Center for Responsive Politics is the nation's premier research group tracking money in U.S. politics and its effect on elections and public policy. OUR VISION is for Americans to be empowered by access to clear and unbiased information about money's role in politics and policy and to use that knowledge to strengthen our democracy. OUR MISSION is to produce and disseminate peerless data and analysis on money in politics to inform and engage Americans, champion transparency, and expose disproportionate or undue influence on public policy.

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'UnRepresented' — Film Screening & Panel Discussion

Organizers: Fix Democracy First, League of Women Voters of WA, and Meaningful Movies Project

Join us for a very special film screening and panel discussion of "UnRepresented" featuring: Daniel Falconer, "UnRepresented" film director; Sheila Krumholz, executive director of Center for Responsive Politics; Ellen Weintraub, commissioner on the Federal Elections Commission; Carl Parrish, community and social activist.

"UnRepresented" investigates the mechanisms that give political insiders enormous, unchecked power. If you are tired of the status quo, then join us for a virtual screening of this important new film and take part in a panel discussion following the movie to hear about grassroots movements taking shape to break this cycle. We will also discuss legislative efforts happening in Washington state.

Location: Webinar

Open Government
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Bjarte Rettedal/Getty Images

K Street, as the lobbying world is known, took in $903 million during the first quarter of this year.

Coronavirus caused a lobbying boom. It's hurting our democracy.

Mizuno is a politics major at Princeton and an intern at Lobbyists 4 Good, a nonprofit crowdfunding platform for people seeking to hire lobbyists for their causes.
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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Protestors gathered outside the Supreme Court on the day, 10 years ago, the Citizens United case was decided.

Five major reflections 10 years after Citizens United

Ten years ago exactly — on Jan. 21, 2010 — the Supreme Court gave the green light to unlimited political expenditures by corporations, labor unions and nonprofit groups. The decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which said curbs on such spending violated the First Amendment, fundamentally changed the way elections are financed today.

A decade later the majority opinion in Citizens United is labeled, more often than any other single thing, as the ultimate antagonist of the democracy reform movement. The ruling has become so infamous it's used as shorthand for a campaign financing system that gives lopsided political advantage to the wealthiest over everyday citizens, including for reasons that have nothing to do with that case. That said, however, the decision has permitted groups that are not affiliated with any candidate or political party to pour almost $4.5 billion into the subsequent campaigns for president and Congress — an astonishing six times the total for all such independent expenditures in the two previous decades.

The 10-year anniversary has campaign finance experts all along the ideological spectrum reflecting on what the decision has meant for American politics, and what changes to laws and regulations might withstand court challenges and limit the impact of Citizens United in the decade ahead — on the assumption the ruling is on the books for at least that much longer.

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