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Represent Bay Area Presents: American Promise

Organizer: RepresentUs

Join us for a presentation by Laura Knipmeyer with American Promise and learn how we can work together to end Citizens United. At this presentation you will:

  • Meet anti-corruption organizers in your area.
  • Learn about what you can do to help unrig our system both locally and nationally.
  • Discuss the American Anti-Corruption Act and what we can do to support it.

If you are interested in making Bay Area work for everyday people want to learn how you can contribute, join the presentation and become a part of the movement!

Location: Berkeley Bowl West Community Room, 920 Heinz Ave., Berkeley, CA

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

There hasn't been a constitutional convention since the framers drew up the governing documents. One segment of the good-government movement wants another gathering, but only to address the campaign finance system.

Inside the messy fight over strategy among campaign finance reformers

Marty Wulfe opened his inbox one day this fall and found an unsettling email from an old friend.

It was a dire warning from the Maryland chapter of Common Cause: Special interests in his state are pushing a "dangerous" proposal for a second constitutional convention.

But Wulfe himself was one of those special interests, because he's a board member of Get Money Out – Maryland. The organization is lobbying the General Assembly to have the state join five others calling for a convention to consider changing the Constitution to allow Congress and state legislatures to rein in money in politics.

While he and other Get Money Out leaders "had a good laugh at being labeled a special interest group," said Wulfe (who views himself as a big fan of Common Cause), the opposition from one of the most venerable voices for democracy reform is no laughing matter. Instead, the rift highlights one of the most impassioned arguments these days in the world of good-government advocacy.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

He faces really long odds, but Bill Weld is still the most prominent Republican to endorse changing the Constitution to permit tougher money-in-politics limits.

Campaign finance constitutional amendment gets a GOP presidential backer

Bill Weld is now the most prominent Republican candidate in favor of amending the Constitution in order to slow the torrent of big money in American politics.

The former Massachusetts governor is the longest of long shots as he runs against President Trump for the GOP nomination. And a constitutional alteration to permit much tighter campaign finance regulation has essentially no near-term shot of getting through Congress with the necessary two-thirds majority and then getting ratified by the required 38 states.

But those who view such a 28th Amendment as the most consequential aspiration of democracy reformers can nonetheless point to Wednesday's announcement as a symbolic milestone: The idea can now claim a measure of bipartisan support in the presidential field.

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