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Balance of Power

Allow us to punish faithless electors, nearly half the states ask Supreme Court

There are now 23 states asking the Supreme Court to answer a basic question about the process of electing the president: Can they bind a member of the Electoral College to vote for the state's popular vote winner?

A group of 22 states on Wednesday asked the court to take up a case involving a so-called faithless elector in Colorado, who was dismissed and replaced in 2016 after refusing to vote for Hilary Clinton even though she won the state's popular vote. The elector challenged his dismissal in a lawsuit, which a lower court allowed to move forward.

The brief from Colorado's allies argues the court should reverse that decision, effectively giving a green light for states to enforce laws that require an elector to cast their votes for the candidate who carries their state. Thirty-two states have such laws.

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Represent King Country Unbreaking America Screening and Introduction to RepresentUs

Organizer: RepresentUs

Whether you're a longtime volunteer or new to the movement, this is the perfect opportunity to join the conversation in Washington and learn how to take action against corruption in your area and around the country. During this particular meeting of the King County Chapter of RepresentUs you'll:

  • See a screening Unbreaking America featuring actress Jennifer Lawrence
  • Meet face-to-face with leaders and activists in your community
  • Have your input heard regarding the current local laws in Washington and what you can do to help
  • Have fun while doing it!

If you are interested in making Washington work for all its citizens and want to learn how you can contribute, join this meeting and the movement! What are you waiting for?

Location: King County Library Delridge Branch, 5423 Delridge Way SW, Seattle, WA

Balance of Power
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Two states asking Supreme Court for permission to regulate Electoral College conduct

This story was updated Nov. 21 with additional information.

Colorado has become the second state to ask the Supreme Court to decide if states may legally bind their presidential electors to vote for the candidate who carried their state.

The issue of so-called faithless electors is the latest aspect of an increasingly heated debate about the virtues and flaws of the Electoral College that has blossomed, especially among progressive democracy reform advocates, now that two of the past five presidential winners (Donald Trump in 2016 and George W. Bush in 2000) got to the Oval Office despite losing the national popular vote.

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Washington state says hackers try every day but that its election security is first in class

Local races and a handful of legislative special elections are the only things on the ballot in Washington next month, but the state's chief election official is nonetheless warning that hackers are hunting for a way to disrupt the contests. She's also asserting that her agency is up to the cybersecurity task because of lessons learned from Russia's 2016 interference.

"We have attempts every day," says Secretary of State Kim Wyman, a Republican. "Tens of thousands of attempts to get into our system ... right now, we are just blocking all of them."

"Some are just trying to see what they can see, what can we get to and what can we play with," she told KIRO. "And some have bigger chess moves. They are trying to undermine confidence that voters have in our system."

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