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Two annual report cards out this week offer some sobering context for those who might instinctively believe that the United States is the best democracy in the world.

Low scores for U.S. government in two global scorecards

When it comes to democracy, sometimes Americans believe they not only invented the idea, they perfected it.

But two respected annual report cards out this week — one looking at democracy and the other at its anathema, governmental corruption — offer some sobering context for those who might instinctively believe that the United States is going to be naturally at the top of the heap.

The latest corruption study, by the venerable global watchdog group Transparency International, finds trust in the United States' political system at an all-time low and that government corruption has become a major concern for most Americans. The newest report on the state of global democracy by the Economist finds the United States dropping steadily in the last decade when compared with other countries.

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Protestors gathered outside the Supreme Court on the day, 10 years ago, the Citizens United case was decided.

Five major reflections 10 years after Citizens United

Ten years ago exactly — on Jan. 21, 2010 — the Supreme Court gave the green light to unlimited political expenditures by corporations, labor unions and nonprofit groups. The decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which said curbs on such spending violated the First Amendment, fundamentally changed the way elections are financed today.

A decade later the majority opinion in Citizens United is labeled, more often than any other single thing, as the ultimate antagonist of the democracy reform movement. The ruling has become so infamous it's used as shorthand for a campaign financing system that gives lopsided political advantage to the wealthiest over everyday citizens, including for reasons that have nothing to do with that case. That said, however, the decision has permitted groups that are not affiliated with any candidate or political party to pour almost $4.5 billion into the subsequent campaigns for president and Congress — an astonishing six times the total for all such independent expenditures in the two previous decades.

The 10-year anniversary has campaign finance experts all along the ideological spectrum reflecting on what the decision has meant for American politics, and what changes to laws and regulations might withstand court challenges and limit the impact of Citizens United in the decade ahead — on the assumption the ruling is on the books for at least that much longer.

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Congress
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6 takeaways from a liberal democracy reform scorecard of Congress

It's no surprise that Democrats in Congress rank better on democracy reform than their Republican counterparts, especially when progressive groups are keeping score. Over the last year, GOP members were largely opposed to Democratic efforts to get big money out of politics and expand access to the ballot box.

So the bipartisan chasm comes off as enormous in the first congressional scorecard produced by End Citizens United, a liberal political action committee that's focused mainly on shrinking money's influence over politics. And the report, released this week, suggests only rare and subtle degrees of disapproval for the blue team on Capitol Hill in 2019 — and only a few areas for faint praise of the red team.

All members were rated on whether they accepted contributions from corporate PACs. The 432 current House members were also scored on how they voted on the floor four times — including of course on HR 1, the comprehensive political process overhaul passed in March — and how many of five measures important to the group they cosponsored. Since the Senate took no votes on legislation connected to democracy reform, the senators in office last year were rated only on a quartet of co-sponsorships.

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Mike Monetta

Mike Monetta is the national director for Wolf-PAC.

Meet the reformer: Mike Monetta, who's got a pack mentality

Mike Monetta joined Wolf-PAC as one of its first volunteers in 2011 and now serves as its national director. The nonpartisan political action committee's goal is to amend the Constitution to allow for more legislation regulating the flow of big money into campaigns, which the Supreme Court ruled is now broadly protected by the First Amendment. Wolf-Pac advocated for what's known as an "Article V Convention," in which two-thirds of the states demand a constitutional convention. (The more common route for a constitutional amendment is for Congress to first pass an amendment and then seek ratification from the states.) Originally from New Hampshire, Monetta led efforts to get Vermont to become the first state calling for such a convention. His answers have been lightly edited for clarity and length.

What's the tweet-length description of your organization?

We are Americans, from all walks of life, using the power of our Constitution to fix corruption and restore a government of, by and for the people.

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