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Bipartisan Policy Center

The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) is a non-profit organization that combines the best ideas from both parties to represent both ends of the political spectrum. BPC drives principled and politically viable policy solutions through the power of rigorous analysis, painstaking negotiation, and aggressive advocacy. It currently focuses on promoting health, energy, national security, the economy, financial regulatory reform, housing, immigration, infrastructure & governance for all Americans. BPC is committed to seeing bipartisan policy solutions enacted into law. As such, BPC Action engages in aggressive advocacy & strategic outreach to unite Republicans and Democrats on polarizing issues.

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Amendment 1 would establish a bipartisan redistricting commission in Virginia.

Virginians: Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good

Rudensky and Li are attorneys in the Democracy Program of the Brennan Center for Justice, a progressive think tank at New York University Law School.

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How Russia used disinformation on social media to target voters

Disinformation: Remain calm and do not spread

With eight days to go until the most important election of our lifetimes, voters are being bombarded with half-truths and outright lies that may confuse the public and suppress the vote. Once again, foreign actors are seeking to disrupt our elections. The FBI recently alleged that Iran hacked into U.S. voter registration data and sent threatening, spoofed emails to voters. There is plenty of domestic misinformation and voter suppression, too — from falsehoods on the president's Twitter account to online campaigns targeting Black and Latino voters. In New Hampshire, the state Republican Party is spreading disinformation about college students' voting rights.

As tempting as it may be to retweet and rave about disinformation, that can be counterproductive. By publicly calling out false claims, we risk elevating the disinformation — and unintentionally spreading it. Instead, here are four concrete steps that the public, election officials, social media platforms and the media can take to combat disinformation.

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Jonathan Kitchen/Getty Images

So many voter toolkits, so little time. Here's where to go shopping.

Some advocacy groups try to influence lawmakers, others focus on making change through the courts. And then there are those working to engage the "regular" people by encouraging them to take action.

Now that voting has begun in much of the country, many democracy reform groups are stepping up their efforts to support voters by offering a trove of online tools designed to educate and engage the electorate in the final days of one of the most consequential presidential elections ever — and one facing a unique range of challenges because of the pandemic.

Below is a sampling. Find the one that's right for you. And if we missed something, let us know at newsroom@thefulcrum.us.

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Congress
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Fixing the House means more staff pay and member budget sway, panel concludes

Its nickname has been the Fix Congress Committee, an unusually bipartisan effort by House members to make their workplace a bit more functional. On Thursday it wrapped up work by endorsing 40 more ideas — including on such politically dicey topics as Capitol Hill's spending on itself and lawmakers steering federal spending toward home.

The panel has been something of a pet project for good-government groups inside the Beltway, who engineered its creation two years ago, pelted it with ideas and prodded it toward consensus.

For these democracy reform advocates, the formula for quelling Washington gridlock and poisoned partisanship includes boosting a legislative branch that's fallen way behind in balance-of-power struggles — and that won't happen until Capitol Hill is a place where politicians and their aides actually want to work for more than a few years and have realistic hope of getting something done.

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