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Princeton Gerrymandering Project

The Princeton Gerrymandering Project does nonpartisan analysis to understand and eliminate partisan gerrymandering at a state-by-state level. The Supreme Court acknowledged the validity of our math but declined to act. Looking ahead, the strongest route to reform is at a state-by-state level—a federalist approach. Our interdisciplinary team aims to give activists and legislators the tools they need to detect offenses and craft bulletproof, bipartisan reform. Our analysis is published widely, and our work is used by legislators and reformers of all communities, without regard to partisan affiliation.

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Gov. Larry Hogan announced the state's first citizen-led redistricting commission on Tuesday and appointed its first three members.

Hogan makes last-minute attempt to prevent Democratic gerrymander in Maryland

Gov. Larry Hogan is making one last effort to stymie partisan gerrymandering in Maryland before the next decade's election maps are drawn.

The Republican governor announced this week the creation of the state's first-ever citizen-led redistricting commission to draft new congressional and state legislative maps. But final approval will ultimately be up to the General Assembly, which is dominated by Democrats.

In most states, partisan map manipulations have favored Republicans, but Maryland is one of the few examples of Democratic gerrymandering. Several states' election maps have been challenged in court over the last decade, including Maryland's. But the Supreme Court deflected judgement over partisan gerrymandering, saying there is no clear standard to use in evaluating the maps.

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Kent Nishimura/Getty Images

Because ... 2020.

Think you know how democracy fared in 2020? Test yourself.

The coronavirus pandemic and subsequent economic calamity will be remembered as the top stories of the year along with an extraordinarily contentious presidential contest — which faced extra challenges from Covid-19 and the incumbent president's unprecedented crusade to discredit American democracy. But the system survived, even as it got set back in some ways and improved at the margins in others.

How well do you remember the big moments in the world of democracy reform this past year? Take this quiz to find out.


The Washington Post/Getty Images

To test the fairness of 21st century districts, try an 18th century method

Eguia is an economics professor at Michigan State University and volunteered for the 2018 Voters Not Politicians ballot initiative that produced the state's new independent redistricting commission.

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The Fair Elections Roadmap: Redistricting and Open Primaries Reform

Organizer: Center for Election Science

In recent years, reformers have sought to heal the partisanship that divides our nation while making our elections fairer and more representative. Two important reforms that have gained steam are redistricting reform and open primaries with a top-two runoff. Proponents argue that each of these reforms would take power out of the hands of the legislators, established political parties, and special interests and return it to the people.

Dr. Christian Grose, associate Professor of political science and public policy at the University of Southern California will talk about his research on these reforms for the Schwarzenegger Institute. We'll explore his analyses of gerrymandering, false majorities and the impact that both redistricting reform and open primary systems have on our elections.

Location: Webinar

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